Do the Outsides of Your Feet Hurt? Your Downtown Toronto Podiatrist Knows Why

We know feet. It’s what we do as a downtown Toronto Podiatrist and Chiropodist. That’s why when our patients come to us complaining about the outside of their feet hurting, we generally look to these places first. After all, pain in that part of your foot is common.

Ligaments

Play sports? Got a job that requires a lot of physical activity? Rolling over on your ankle happens all the time to cause torn ligaments. Symptoms include pain on the outside of the foot as well as instability and bruising.

Twist an ankle and you can tear a ligament. Then you’ve got what’s commonly called an ankle sprain. Damaging a ligament at the side of your foot accounts for over 80% of all the ankle injuries we see.

Fractures

We’ve been in business for years as a downtown Toronto podiatrist and chiropodist. In that time, we’ve seen little fractures that are left untreated become big problems in the long run. It’s one of the reasons we tell our patients to ease into strenuous exercise.

Sports are the number one offender. Sometimes a fracture can be only the width of a human hair. But ask anyone who has one and they’ll tell you how painful that can be.
When we treat stress fractures they heal quickly. Break into a new training level slowly. That will help you avoid this issue. Taking up a new sport is always a good idea but you will need to take the same cautious approach at first.

Bunions

When your big toe starts to rotate inward, painful bunions follow. You can’t leave the situation alone for too long. There’s a lot of pain involved and your toes can even cross over each other. Tight fitting shoes are quite often the culprit.

However, those stylish loafers aren’t the only reason that you can get a bunion. Genetics play a big role. If someone in your family has this issue, your chances go up of getting it yourself.

Research has shown that bunions are rare in cultures where people don’t wear any shoes. We’re not advocating for that given the Toronto winters, but getting the right shoe size is important. Truth be told, both genetics and footwear play a role.

There is another factor. As you get older, the risk for getting bunions increases. Getting them treated by a downtown Toronto podiatrist stops the symptoms from getting worse.

Foot Friendly Tips for Picking Healthy Shoes from Your Downtown Toronto Foot Doctor

Working with you to keep your feet in great shape is what we do. Finding the right shoes that fit is a big part of good foot health. Here’s a few great tips from your downtown Toronto foot doctor that will steer you in the right direction.

Find the Right Fasteners

Style is the first box most of us check off when we’re looking for the right footwear. We want new shoes to look good. That doesn’t mean you need to sacrifice shoes that are good for you.
Start with the fasteners. Laces and buckles add a touch of elegance. But at the same time, they allow for adjustment. Even Velcro straps do their part to keep your tootsies comfortable.

Heed the Heel

Make sure the heel doesn’t slip back and forth. Try to slide it with your hands when you try the shoes on in the store. It’s a simple test that can prevent issues down the road. They should be snug.

Timing Is Everything.

The chances are you’ve heard that phrase before but never expected it to relate to your feet. We are the downtown Toronto foot doctor team that knows how important the right shoes are. Shop for them in the afternoon. Your feet expand during the day and this is the best time to get a fit that works for you.

Don’t Tinker with the Tread

Everything about picking healthy shoes is important. Make sure the tread extends from the toe all the way back to the heel. It’ll give you a good grip on slippery surfaces. You might not go out hiking in your new shoes, but a good tread can come in handy on a wet city street.

Stand in Them

Standing up in your new shoes is about more than checking them out for comfort. Your longest toe needs to have about 6 mm of space. Anything less can cause problems down the road like bunions or hammertoe.

Walk around in them to get a real feel for the fit. Don’t lie to yourself. If they don’t fit well don’t tell yourself they just need to be broken in.

Stick your fingers inside the shoe. It’s the best way to check for tags or seams that can cause problems like blisters.

The socks you wear matter. When you’re shopping, make sure you bring along the kind you’ll be wearing in the shoe. Got questions? Your downtown Toronto foot doctor is always ready to help.

Orthotics Toronto and Support

Who Can Get Foot Pain?

Being a distance runner, I have had my fair share of experience with overuse conditions. It does not matter whether you are a runner or someone who walks everywhere for transportation, or even an office worker, repetitive movements over time can result in overuse injuries. There has been many trends in the minimal footwear approach. I have also had my fair share of personal experience in trying to adapt to minimal footwear. Each time I did try to transition into this type of footwear, I did encounter more aches and pains and even injuries. I seemed to always stay healthy longer in supportive footwear, orthotics and staying on top of injury prevention drills.

My Approach

My approach to care emphasizes a well rounded approach that addresses foot injury as well as the mechanism of action which causes fatigue to the foot as well. A foot injury requires treating and rehabilitating the foot in a progressive manner that also encompasses restoring other imbalances above the foot. The underlying mechanism of action of injury should be addressed or else the foot injury may return if the original reason why it happened was not corrected.

How Orthotics Help

Orthotics, with proper footwear can also help deflect forces on the foot and provide support for injury prevention. Orthotics helped me keep injuries at bay. Each time I slowly tried to ween into a less supportive footwear, I would be on the brink of injury, notice more tissue strain or even injury. I liked the feeling of fast but I ended up feeling beat up.

Bottom of the foot pain and general foot pain is sometimes stubborn to treat as the foot takes the load of the body. It is very difficult to rest the tissues . Supporting an injured foot helps to let the injured area rest and reduce load to heal. I always promote a well rounded strengthening and stretching program combined with support and to encourage people to solely not rely on support .

For my assessments I like to perform a full lower extremity biomechanical to locate individual weaknesses. Foot pain can result from weakness above the foot which can result in adding more stresses placed upon the foot. When the foot  is injured I approach treating the area by a progressive treatment plan as well as addressing the other imbalances that may have lead to more foot strain. I do find the use of orthotics to help reduce these forces placed upon the foot and provide support.